AEM Basics

What are AEM and Accessible Technologies?

Students with disabilities frequently experience barriers to the use of printed materials, digital materials, and technology. Examples where barriers might arise may include textbooks, articles, digital documents, websites, apps, and electronic devices. 

The four types of specialized formats are braille, large print, audio, and digital text:

 

Braille is a tactile system of reading and writing made up of raised dot patterns for letters, numbers, and punctuation marks. This format is used almost exclusively by people with visual impairments. Braille may be either embossed (a permanent printed document) or refreshable (electronically generated and accessed via a braille display device).

 

Large print is generally defined as print that is larger than the print sizes commonly used by the general population (8 to 12 points in size). One guideline used defines large print as 18 point or larger. A document produced in large print format usually has more white space and may not look like the original document, but it contains the same information. Large print may be printed on pages that are the same size as a standard textbook page or on pages of a larger size.

 

Audio formats present content as speech to which a student listens. Audio formats include recorded human voice or synthesized electronic speech.

 

Digital text provides electronic content that is delivered on a computer or another device. Electronic content can be changed in many ways (e.g., size, contrast, read aloud) to accommodate the needs and preferences of a student. How content is presented to a user depends upon the technology being used and student needs.

  • Facebook

AKCAM IS A PROGRAM OF SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICE AGENCY

COPYRIGHT © 2019 - SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICE AGENCY

The AKCAM website is currently under construction. More changes will be coming soon!